Cover Review | Dissonance by Mariella Hunt

We’re so excited to reveal the cover for Mariella Hunt’s first book, Dissonance! There’s a haunting simplicity to it that echoes the themes of disability (yay for diversity!), isolation, and hollow promises. And now that I’ve made the necessary musical puns, feast your eyes on this cover:

Fifteen-year-old Allie Grant lives crippled by her illness. Though kept in isolation, she’s never alone: A spirit named Song lurks in the silence of her bedroom.

When Song reveals its dark nature on the night of her recital, the show ends in tragedy. Verging on death, Allie’s taken in by an uncle she’s never met.

Julian claims to be a Muse with power over music and answers that’ll heal her. The cure she needs is rare, requiring of him a difficult sacrifice. Allie soon suspects her uncle has a secret that’ll turn her world around.

But with days left to live, she might fade without learning the truth…like the finishing chord of a song.


About the Author

Mariella Hunt is a writer with a strong love for coffee and guinea pigs. She likes using big words in everyday speech, and keeps journals of quotes from the greats. Most days you’ll find her on a well-loved armchair, reading–or working on one of her many projects. As she cannot stick to an outline, she rewrites way too much.

To learn more about Dissonance, follow her on Facebook and Twitter–or visit her website.

Thanks to Mariella for letting us show this to the world! It’s great to be able to support diverse representation and self-pubbed novelists at the same time.

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Blog Tour: Guest Post | Anoosha Lalani’s Creature Meet-and-Greet!

Keepers Tour copy

Hey, everyone – we’re beyond excited to be on the blog tour for The Keepers by Anoosha Lalani! This is a YA paranormal book that promises to be full of action and adventure that came out on September 30 from REUTS Publications. But don’t take my word for how great it sounds – feast your eyes on the beautiful cover and blurb and see what I mean for yourself.

Find the Book: Goodreads | Amazon | REUTS Website

Sixteen-year-old Isra Kalb has grown up starving in the slums of Islamabad. But hunger is only the beginning. When her father is mysteriously murdered and madness corrupts her mother’s mind, she’s left alone to fend for herself and her sister. Homeless and destitute, the only thing she has to remember her loving family by is a commonplace necklace–an amulet barely worth keeping.

Or so she thinks.

Swept into a web of lies, deceit and turmoil, Isra struggles to find a place for herself and Zaffirah, wondering if the strange creatures and visions she’s seeing are indications of the madness that took her mother. But when Snatchers capture Zaffirah, Isra learns her amulet isn’t so useless after all. Transported to Zarcane–the beastly garden where Adam and Eve were born–Isra comes face to face with her destiny. She’s a Keeper, charged with protecting the borders of Zarcane and keeping the demon hordes lurking in the shadows from taking realms that are not their own. And she’s not the only one; there’s a second Keeper, a boy whose identity hasn’t been revealed.

Now, in order to save her sister and fulfill her family’s legacy as Keeper of the Amulet, she has to find the second Keeper and close the borders. Surrounded by betrayal, trapped between warring factions of angels, and desperate to save the only family she has left, Isra must decide:

Who can she trust when nothing is what it seems?

And if you’re still not convinced, here’s a book trailer for your viewing enjoyment:

Today’s guest post, from the author herself, is a creature “meet-and-greet”, where you get introduced to just a few of the wild and wonderful creatures in the world of Zarcane, the land that our heroine, Isra, eventually gets to in the framework of The Keepers. There’s some seriously cool Bible-inspired worldbuilding going on here that I really like, and I can’t wait to get my hands on the actual book.

Enough of me now – let’s turn it over to Anoosha Lalani, the author of The Keepers!


As you guys may have realized upon reading my blurb, a significant part of my story takes place in a mystical land I call Zarcane, but to those more closely acquainted with the biblical tale of Adam and Eve, it may also be known as the Garden of Eden. Like our very own Earth, Zarcane has its own special flora and fauna. Today, it will be my pleasure to introduce you to some of its lovely and not so lovely creatures.

I’ll start of with the exquisite Abaddon. The Abaddon was inspired by the New Testament Book of Revelation, where the Abaddon is presented as an angel who leads an army of locusts. My Abaddon is a fallen angel who not only has a creepy bug army, but she also rules over wraiths and centaurs and pretty much most of Zarcane. She also happens to be so beautiful and sophisticated that I am unfortunately unable to find you guys a picture, instead I will leave you with this description from Isra’s eyes:

Her burgundy dress fell behind her, but it didn’t drag on the floor collecting dust; it floated a few minute centimeters just above it. Her hair framed her face in loose curls that matched the color of her dress. The Abaddon met my gaze for a second, her cool, penetrating blue eyes on mine. Everything froze around me. She grinned, knowing the effect of her stare, and turned away. She was beautiful with high, protruding cheekbones and bee-stung lips.

Now, what exactly are these creepy bugs that the Abaddon has under her control you ask? Think of an insect— a big black flying beetle would be most appropriate. Now give it a face and human limbs and sharpened razor teeth. These bugs often come in huge clouds and can take the shape of other things like serpents or even other humans.

The more virtuous counterparts of these creatures are the rose flies. This time I want you to think of butterflies with human parts. These fairy-like creatures have beautiful voices and they roam around the rose gardens. They also happen to be the first creatures that Isra sees when she enters Zarcane.

As Isra spends more of her time in Zarcane, she meets Itai, a centaur warrior serving the Abaddon. Itai looks like what one would expect a centaur to look like, brave and strong. He also had a sketchy secret. Despite this, Itai has made his way into a special place in my heart and so again, I am unable to choose a random picture of a centaur and claim it to be him so instead I will leave you with another description:

A horse-like creature galloped towards me. He was a creature from another story book. Long, brown stallion legs supported his human torso. Tanned skins were tied on to his chest with thin threads of animal sinew. On his back was a quiver of arrows and a bow.

Accompanying Isra through the tale from beginning to end, we also have Dearg. Dearg is a traveller, meaning that he is the only creature that can travel between realms even when the borders are locked. He always knows more than he lets on and frustrates Isra on many occasions but she can’t sever her attachment to him. He’s almost like a pet dog meets old man and Isra feels somewhat responsible for him. Again, I present you with a description of this very special creature:

A dark grey creature about three feet high stood before me. His skin was made entirely of stone and he looked almost like a grumpy cat standing on its hind legs. Certainly not human but not animal either. A creature of completely different race altogether—one not from this world.

Now these are only a few of the creatures that roam Zarcane. You have yet to meet the glass men, the color changing demon servant of the Abaddon and the serpent. I warn you they happen to be creatures you don’t want to miss.


About the Author:

author photo

Anoosha Lalani has always had an insatiable desire to escape reality. It was a childhood trait that never seemed to fade out. If Anoosha were to make one wish, it would be to have wings to journey off the face of this planet and into the worlds of her stories.

When she’s not writing, you may find Anoosha attending high school in Singapore. Having moved around so much, she has had the wonderful opportunity to be exposed to a vibrant range of cultures, which often seem to find their way into her stories. Anoosha was born in Pakistan, the setting of her most recent novel, The Keepers.

Find Anoosha: Website | Twitter


Doesn’t that sound amazing? Be sure to add this book to your TBR – I know I am! – and be sure to follow along with the rest of the blog tour!

GET EVEN by Gretchen McNeil Pre-Order Giveaway!

Gretchen has launched a brand new marketing campaign for her fall 2014 release GET EVEN, the first book in her new Don’t Get Mad series for Balzer+Bray/HarperCollins.  Pitched as “The Breakfast Club with a body count,” Don’t Get Mad is her first series, with GET DIRTY following closely on the heels of GET EVEN, releasing in June of 2015.

GetEven_finalFind the book: Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble
Release Date: September 16, 2014

The Breakfast Club meets Pretty Little Liars in Gretchen McNeil’s witty and suspenseful novel about four disparate girls who join forces to take revenge on high school bullies and create dangerous enemies for themselves in the process.

Bree, Olivia, Kitty, and Margot have nothing in common—at least that’s what they’d like the students and administrators of their elite private school to think. The girls have different goals, different friends, and different lives, but they share one very big secret: They’re all members of Don’t Get Mad, a secret society that anonymously takes revenge on the school’s bullies, mean girls, and tyrannical teachers.

When their latest target ends up dead with a blood-soaked “DGM” card in his hands, the girls realize that they’re not as anonymous as they thought—and that someone now wants revenge on them. Soon the clues are piling up, the police are closing in . . . and everyone has something to lose.

 

To Enter:

(1) Pre-order GET EVEN in paperback, ebook, or audio format

(2) Submit proof of purchase (email, scan, photo, etc. of your receipt) at gretchenmcneil.giveaways@gmail.com, along with a valid mailing address.  Note: if you have already submitting proof of purchase for a previous giveaway, you must do so again.

(3) On September 16, 2014, you will be mailed a signed, special edition booklet containing the first two (2) chapters of GET DIRTY, which does not go on sale until June 2015, along with bonus content for GET EVEN and a signed Don’t Get Mad bookplate.

(4) Submissions for the giveaway close September 15, 2014 at 11:59pm PST.

* You Must be 13+ to enter.
* One Entry Per Pre-Order Proof of Purchase.
* Open to U.S. and Canada residents only, but participating bookstores will ship internationally!

Get-EvenLayeredSM_zpse5304a7c

 

Review Tour | Sucker Literary Volume III Edited by Hannah R. Goodman

We’re thrilled to be part of the review tour for Volume III of the YA literary magazine Sucker Literary. There aren’t enough venues for young adult short fiction out there, and we’re so glad that Sucker Literary is one of the few. And since our great love at Literoses is YA in all its shapes and sizes, it’s only natural that we’d want to review and spread the word about such a wonderful publication. Christina’s sharing her thoughts on this edition of the magazine – see them below!

(NOTE: I received this issue for free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.)

Reviewer: Christina
Release Date: April 15, 2014
Publisher: G+G Books
Age Group: YA
Genres: Any and all genres in the YA age group!
Pages: 204 (paperback)
Format/Source: Kindle, Received from publisher (Thank you, Sucker Literary/G+G Books!)
Find the Book: Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Book Depository

Rating: 4/5

Eleven stories that delve into the depths of our experience—driven by fierce and untouched love that makes us seek, lose, fear, desire, long, reflect, survive, steal, protect, fall, and confess.

I’ll be reviewing the stories one by one, as they’re all so different, and in the order in which they appeared in my review copy.

“Her Tree Boy Blaze” by Lina Branter

Bullied and alone, Ainsley seeks refuge in the arms of a strange boy.

This was, in a word, haunting. The mix of fantasy and reality was perfectly jarring, and the third-person present tense narration did wonders for that blend. No doubt everyone’s familiar with my high standards for writing style, but Branter hit the spot with her talent for infusing mundane descriptions with mystery and power. While dealing with very real issues of cyberbullying, offline bullying, sex, and harassment, “Her Tree Boy Blaze” also weaves in a magical, earthy romance and the development of a teenage protagonist in ways even she didn’t think possible. This is one of those stories that presents itself as one thing – in this case, a contemporary “issue” story – and then slaps you with a quick “oh, never mind” and takes you on a ride completely unlike anything else out there. I would read a whole book of this, no lie.

“A Different Kind of Cute” by Hannah R. Goodman

“Pasty and chubby” Charlotte makes a public play for the “Tan and Smooth” king.

Effervescent, snarky, and almost painfully relatable, Charlotte is the main highlight of this funny and wistful short story. She deftly and subtly explores the idea of “conventional beauty” in her high-school setting with an irrepressible verve, and there’s nothing that she can’t be honest about. She is thoroughly, lovably teenage, and proud of it, too. Most importantly, she feels real, and that is the great achievement of “A Different Kind of Cute”. Though I wish the plot had been more drawn out – so I could read more, of course – that is thanks to this girl’s narrative voice. Even the parts that seem shallow really aren’t, and Charlotte’s pining for the ultimate popular/handsome boy is really a frame for a much deeper undercurrent. This story is irreverent. This story sparkles. This story will pack a punch in a part of your heart you didn’t even know existed.

“Just a Matter of Time” by Charity Tahmaseb

Time is slipping away for overachieving Sadie Lin, but reigniting an old flame might help.

This premise! Oh man. Though the one-sentence synopsis up there might not be the best descriptor for this story, let me sum it up for you: TIME THIEVERY. I could totally understand Sadie’s panic in the beginning – I’m often called an “overachiever” in school myself, and it does feel like there’s never enough time to get everything done. But making that very terribly literal? Now there’s an awesome setup. The character dynamics are so well done here as well. Maybe it’s because of my shared characteristics with Sadie, but I connected with her right away. I felt like I was getting a whole novel’s worth of development for all the central characters despite the story’s brevity, and this contributed hugely to my enjoyment of an already-great idea. This, just like “Her Tree Boy Blaze”, was a keenly observant blend of fantasy and contemporary fiction – and yet it had a wildly different flavor.

“If It Rains” by Kristina Wojtaszek

Scarred by a pressuring ex, Alexandra finally faces the rain.

This was such a freeing story. That’s how it felt the whole way through: completely and utterly free of restrictions. It was edgy. It was a breath of fresh air. But it wasn’t loud or obnoxious – it knew what it was worth and it let that value simmer in my mind. It came and went subtly but powerfully. I loved that this story mixed friendship and romance in equal proportions and tied them together so they didn’t clash. The greatest thing about that friendship-romance mix? It was about as cliché-free as it gets, and so much fun to read because of that uniqueness – adorable yet very meaningful. The voice was bittersweet and reflective in the very best ways while still capturing that YA feel perfectly. That balance is really hard to get a feel for, but it was definitely achieved here. This story certainly knew what it was doing, which made it truly a fulfilling experience to read.

“Halfway From” by Shelli Cornelison

A halfway house is no home for Dawn—or is it?

“Halfway From” was quirky. Like, its quirkiness knows no bounds, okay? But that was the appeal of it – the way it made seemingly disparate elements fit together. It had heart and it was messy. It wasn’t afraid to be all over the place. It was glorious in a way that took some getting used to. It wouldn’t take “no” for an answer. I admit, this story may not appeal to all readers. There’s distinctive anger in its narration and a tendency to ramble. But I really appreciated its broken-glass tone, its light-on-fire approach. Dawn was the kind of person I’d be afraid to talk to in real life, but somehow finding her sharp and vulnerable in the lines of a short story felt right. This wasn’t a pretty piece of writing. It wasn’t a cleanly cut piece. It wanted to snap things in half and leave its readers for dead at some parts. But it was certainly a strong piece, in all the ways that matter.

“Superpower” by Mary Malhotra

How will Dana survive knowing everyone at school thinks she’s a monster, when they just may be right?

Ooh. SO MUCH YES. The mind-reading superpower is something encountered by readers all too often in every corner of literature. It’s so common and therefore so difficult to get right. But this – it’s sensitive. It’s unassuming. It’s very deeply emotional. And this is its strength. Dana’s not a flashy narrator. She doesn’t need to get her thoughts across in violent or overly colorful ways. She’s filled with regret and some resentment, but it doesn’t make her lash out. She doesn’t feel obligated to call attention to her mind-reading ability, but it’s present all the same. The magic is only weird for a moment – and then it melts into Dana’s reality. This story centers much more around the delicacy of person-person relationships and how difficult it is to repair them. Plus, it features a truly original way of introducing the mind-reading skill – adding a standout speculative bonus to what’s already a great mix of elements.

“Valentine’s Day” by Claudia Snow Classon

JJ and her crush finally get a moment alone—at his girlfriend’s hottest party of the year.

This story was hilarious and confident in its security (whoops, oxymoron). It was fun, flippant, and – dare I say it? – flirty. JJ definitely knows how to bring some fresh, vivacious light to a tried-and-true situation. It’s true that getting near your crush at his girlfriend’s party might not be the most groundbreaking premise in the world, but JJ and her bubbly narration never seem to care. This is some seriously cute contemporary fiction (and no, I’m not particularly ashamed that that’s another horrendous oxymoron). It’s like the infectious smile that spreads around the room despite everyone’s best intentions. If it were a song, it would be the one with a catchy beat and lyrics that everyone wants to dance to. Classon has done some good work with “Valentine’s Day” – sure to bring a laugh and a lighter heart for anyone who’s been reading Le Serious Shiz for a little too long.

“The H8TE” by Lilliam Rivera

Sixteen-year old Sarah prepares for her first day of school by chaining up her Mamí in her bedroom.

Chills. CHILLS. This is gritty, dark, dangerous. It is matches and switchblades and things gone wrong. Everything gone wrong, in fact. And it’s a knockout story for sure. A virus known as “the H8TE” has been spreading in Sarah’s region, infecting people and turning them into feral shadows of their former selves. And Sarah’s mother has it and is slowly crumbling before her eyes. The desperation and grief wrapped up in this is achingly human and universal despite the obvious science-fiction element. It’s full of panic, blind white panic that left me shaken. This story plummeted and soared in zigzags that made me heartsick and hopeful. It was spellbinding in a razor-sharp, tragic, brutal way. There was nothing it barred from me, nothing it avoided colliding with. This story fell apart in front of me and I loved it.

“How to Fall” by Kacey Vanderkarr

Alyssa’s life is a well-rehearsed ballet until a tragedy sends her hurtling towards a fall.

This was so well done. DANG. It’s a tight, complex weave of flashbacks and reality – a sweeping downward spiral. The way the flashbacks were placed and maneuvered within the present moment was breathtaking and beautifully, honestly written. This was especially noteworthy because many stories have trouble with shifting back and forth between timeframes. And the movement of the words, spun with such finesse, was a privilege to read. The layers of Alyssa’s complicated relationship with her mother were peeled back one by one using glimpses into the past. The ending was triumphant and perfect, like the sun coming out after rain, and truly satisfying. There was dance, there was sadness, there was an undeniable, brilliant hope, and most of all, there was one girl learning to pick herself back up. This story was a sigh and a death and a birth all at once. It was… pretty awesome.

“The Chemistry of You and Me” by Evelyn Ehrlich

Loving a boy is as simple as chemistry . . . unless that boy is an unstable element.

Okay, whoa. I’m in love. Madly. This was scientifically poetic – which is one of my favorite descriptors for anything ever. I’ve always had a fascination with the periodic table anyway, because I’m nerdy like that, but this combined an emotional, pure, thorny relationship with that interest, and it worked so much better than I ever could’ve imagined. Just… chemistry. Chemistry has such a capacity for telling stories. And the way it all tied together – the story is told in a series of vignettes about the narrator and her boyfriend, Cameron, and I have a weakness for vignettes. These snapshots feel like the truest portrait of life sometimes, and Ehrlich did a superb job of capturing that. Above all, her writing took power from the past, and there was weight in the narration. Reality is a thing with many folds, and that was apparent here. I can do nothing but applaud.

“Black Lacy” by Kimberly Kreines

The beautiful girl in the black, lacy push-up bra says that it’s time for Brenn to stop lying . . . at least to herself.

Dang. I mean, I haven’t read that much LGTBQ+ contemporary literature, but I’ve pretty much liked all of what I’ve seen so far. And this is no exception. Brenn spends the majority of the story feeling weak about her sexuality, trying desperately to deny it despite the obvious signs. Her self-realization is done very smoothly, and I loved watching her accept that she was attracted to girls – very gradually, but that was what made it so brilliant. It felt organic. It felt almost anonymous – this situation could apply to any girl discovering her sexuality in any school in any area – and that’s what really ensured that its impact was as far-reaching as possible. I felt as if I was experiencing this along with Brenn, and that introductory but deep aspect of it pulled this story closer to me. It was readying itself, and now that I’m finished with it, I feel that preparing sort of feeling myself.

Overall

GO. YOU NEED THIS MAGAZINE IN YOUR LIFE.

Blog Tour: Author Interview | The Rose Master by Valentina Cano

The Rose Master Blog Bagde

Welcome to the blog tour for The Rose Master by Valentina Cano! (You may remember that we also revealed the cover a while back.) It released on June 24 from REUTS Publications, and it’s called “a little bit of romance with a lot of spooky” by its publisher – which sounds totally fine by us. Today we’re doing a short interview with the author, Valentina herself! Enjoy her witty and thoughtful answers to our questions below.

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1. The protagonist of The Rose Master, Anne Tinning, sounds so intriguing! What was your favorite part about writing her?

The most exciting part, as well as the trickiest part, of creating Anne was getting her voice just right. As a parlor maid, she needed to be outwardly subservient to her superiors, but I wanted a contrasting irreverence in her internal monologues. I wanted her thoughts to be completely free from convention and for those thoughts to slowly become her real voice as she gains more freedom in Rosewood Manor.

2. If The Rose Master were a food, what would it be?

A rich, dark chocolate cake with tart raspberry filling.

3. What is your favorite writing spot?

I have an antique desk that’s been in my family for a long time. There’s a window right next to it, so I get some natural light and I get to see one of the ducks around my neighborhood who loves to fly over my fence and eat the cat food I have out for stray cats. As soon as I start writing, my mynah bird, who is free around the house because I can’t abide seeing birds in cages, flies to me and sleeps either on my shoulder while I write or right on the laptop.

4. What’s something bizarre or disturbing that you learned as a result of writing The Rose Master?

I learned quite a bit about what maids went through during this time period. I knew a bit of it from all the Gothic reading I’ve done, from Jane Eyre to Wuthering Heights and Rebecca, but the details of their lives was truly astounding to read about.

5. What do you do when you run into writers’ block?

I take long walks. There’s a park a few blocks away from my house, so I put on my sneakers and head out when I’ve come to a stand-still in a novel. There’s something about walking that is able to bring ideas forward to where I can access them.

6. Are any of your characters based on real people?

Not really, at least not people I personally know. When I wrote Lord Grey, I pictured him a bit like a young Benedict Cumberbatch, but he became a much richer character as the novel progressed, so he lost the resemblance.

7. That said, which of your characters do you think is most like yourself?

In appearance, probably Anne. She is small like I am (I am only 5 feet), with brown eyes and curly, brown hair. But in personality, I am more like Lord Grey. Slightly sarcastic and not the best when dealing with authority.

8. How did you go about finding The Rose Master‘s lovely title?

Well, the manor in which the action takes place is full of roses that bloom at all times. Lord Grey is the master of the manor, so it is appropriate to call him the Rose Master. There are other reasons, as well, but I don’t want to give too much away.

9. Okay, we here at Literoses absolutely adore the cover for The Rose Master. But how much does it reveal about the story? (Non-spoilery, of course!)

Isn’t it beautiful? I loved it when I saw it. It really captures the mood of the novel, as well as the most important symbols. The crow is important, as well as the mirror and the roses. The skull lets you know the story is going to scare you, fingers crosses, bringing in some of that Victorian gothic atmosphere I’ve loved since I could read.

10. Any more books in the works that we can hear a little more about?

I already have the sequel to The Rose Master planned out, so I just have to sit down and write it. I also have a contemporary paranormal novel I’m polishing up that I hope to get out there some time soon.

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About The Rose Master:

trm-reveal

The day Anne Tinning turns seventeen, birds fall from the sky. But that’s hardly the most upsetting news. She’s being dismissed from the home she’s served at since she was a child, and shipped off to become the newly hired parlor maid for a place she’s never heard of. And when she sees the run-down, isolated house, she instantly knows why:

There’s something wrong with Rosewood Manor.

Staffed with only three other servants, all gripped by icy silence and inexplicable bruises, and inhabited by a young master who is as cold as the place itself, the house is shrouded in neglect and thick with fear. Her questions are met with hushed whispers, and she soon finds herself alone in the empty halls, left to tidy and clean rooms no one visits.

As the feeling of being watched grows, she begins to realize there is something else in the house with them–some creature that stalks the frozen halls and claws at her door. A creature that seems intent on harming her.

When a fire leaves Anne trapped in the manor with its Master, she finally demands to know why. But as she forces the truth about what haunts the grounds from Lord Grey, she learns secrets she isn’t prepared for. The creature is very real, and she’s the only one who can help him stop it.

Now, Anne must either risk her life for the young man she’s grown to admire, or abandon her post while she still can.

Find It: REUTS | Goodreads

~~~~~~

About Valentina Cano:

Valentina Cano Author Photo

Valentina Cano is a student of classical singing who spends whatever free time she has either reading or writing. She also watches over a veritable army of pets, including her five, very spoiled, snakes. Her works have appeared in numerous publications and her poetry has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize and Best of the Web. She lives in Miami, Florida.

Find Valentina: Website | Twitter | Facebook | Goodreads

Cover Reveal | The Rose Master by Valentina Cano

We’re so thrilled to be able to reveal the cover for the newest upcoming title from REUTS Publications – Valentina Cano’s The Rose Master! Billed as “Beauty and the Beast” meets Jane Eyre,  this YA historical/horror novel sounds right up our alley, and we’re definitely looking forward to reading it.

And you should be excited about the cover itself as well! REUTS has a strong track record of beautiful designs for its books. It’s truly one of the finest indie publishers out there, and it’s growing fast.

Now, without further ado, feast your eyes on the lovely, chilling cover of The Rose Master!

trm-reveal

Here’s a blurb, for those of you who are, like us, already getting grabby hands:

The day Anne Tinning turns seventeen, birds fall from the sky. But that’s hardly the most upsetting news. She’s being dismissed from the home she’s served at since she was a child, and shipped off to become the newly hired parlor maid for a place she’s never heard of. And when she sees the run-down, isolated house, she instantly knows why:

There’s something wrong with Rosewood Manor.

Staffed with only three other servants, all gripped by icy silence and inexplicable bruises, and inhabited by a young master who is as cold as the place itself, the house is shrouded in neglect and thick with fear. Her questions are met with hushed whispers, and she soon finds herself alone in the empty halls, left to tidy and clean rooms no one visits.

As the feeling of being watched grows, she begins to realize there is something else in the house with them–some creature that stalks the frozen halls and claws at her door. A creature that seems intent on harming her.

When a fire leaves Anne trapped in the manor with its Master, she finally demands to know why. But as she forces the truth about what haunts the grounds from Lord Grey, she learns secrets she isn’t prepared for. The creature is very real, and she’s the only one who can help him stop it.

Now, Anne must either risk her life for the young man she’s grown to admire, or abandon her post while she still can.

About the Author:

Valentina Cano is a student of classical singing who spends whatever free time she has either reading or writing. She also watches over a veritable army of pets, including her five, very spoiled, snakes. Her works have appeared in numerous publications and her poetry has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize and Best of the Web. She lives in Miami, Florida.

Website | Twitter | Facebook | Goodreads | REUTS Site

Wow – I definitely approve of this cover! Thanks to REUTS for letting us show it to the world!